Archive for 'Tips'

I am sure most of you guys take the freedom on the Internet for given. If you live in a western country, this is a consequence of being able to access any website and to publish anything you feel compelled to.

That is not the situation on all parts of the world, however. On some countries people can’t access basic websites like Hotmail or Wikipedia. On others, they can’t have blogs or create websites. On others yet, they can’t even own a computer with Internet access!

Over at DailyBits we did a compilation with the Top 10 Countries Censoring the Web.

Here is a quote from the 10th position, Pakistan:

The rundown

Pakistan started censoring the web in 2000, when the main target was anti-Islamic content. Over the time, it seems, they liked the possibility to control the Internet traffic, and have been increasing the scope of their censorship system ever since.

How does the censorship work?

There are only three international gateways on the country, and all of them are controlled by the Pakistan Telecommunication Company. The government, therefore, is able to monitor and block most unwanted traffic using filtering software (although their technical apparatus is not sophisticated).

Internet service providers are also required by law to monitor the activity of their clients to make sure that they are not accessing prohibited websites.

What kind of content is blocked?

In the first years of the web censorship in Pakistan, the main target was anti-Islamic content and websites that were related to political autonomy movements (e.g., the Balochi one). In 2003, however, the Pakistan Telecommunication Company declared that they would also officially block all pornographic websites.

In 2006 mainstream western websites, including Wikipedia and several newspapers, got blocked as well. The intensification of the censorship was propelled by the episode of the Danish cartoons that contained images of the Prophet Muhammad.

Check the link above to read the full article and see the other 9 countries.


Copyright by Daily Blog Tips.

Web Censorship: The 10 Worst Countries To Blog From

3 Newsletters You Should Definitely Subscribe To

When I first started using the Internet, I was a bit afraid of subscribing to email newsletters. Why? Because I thought that people would just spam the heck out of me with offers and sales pitches.

Lately, however, I started subscribing to a few of them, and I must confess that some provide a real value for the subscribers. The trick is to identify people that genuinely want to build a community and help their readers (as opposed to helping their own pockets…).

There are 3 particularly that I think you guys would benefit from.

The first one is the WordPress Newsletter from my friend Joost de Valk. Joost is a Jedi Master when it comes to WordPress, and he shares all his tips on the newsletter and on his blog. He is also always looking for the coolest plugins, making it a must read if you use WordPress.

The second one is the email list from Jason Calacanis. Sure, the guy is a bit controversial, but he sure knows the online publishing and startup environment. His emails are always packed with information and opinions. If you consider yourself a web entrepreneur, go check it out.

Finally, Darren Rowse also launched his Problogger Newsletter a while back. It is basically a complement to the blog, but it brings some insider information, and access to some of his stuff before it goes live on the blog.

Now what about you, what newsletters are you subscribed to that you would recommend to other people? Let me know and I will check them out.


Copyright by Daily Blog Tips.

3 Newsletters You Should Definitely Subscribe To

That is a common cliché among bloggers, make money online experts and web entrepreneurs. I am sure you heard it before. Heck, I used to give this advice myself. It goes like this:

If you want to make money online, you got pick a topic that you are passionate about. You need to love it, else it will not work.

I used to agree with it, one hundred percent.

Lately, however, I started questioning that rule. Creating a website on a topic that you love is certainly a good strategy, and it works well for many people, but I am not sure if it is the only way to go, or the best one.

The first flaw I see on that rule is the following fact: if the niche or topic you love is not a profitable one, it will be pretty hard to make a lot of money online with it no matter what.

Suppose you love tea. Should you write about it if you want to make money online? I am not sure. You could certainly create a popular website around tea, but if you decided to go with a more profitable niche instead, while putting the same effort and time, you could end up making much more money.

One argument that people use to back up the “you got write about what you love” theory is the fact that if you choose a topic merely because it is profitable, soon you will lose the motivation. If you write about something you love, on the other hand, you will have content for years to come.

This is partially true, but not completely. Why? Because some people get motivated by the pure desire of making money or becoming successful.

In other words, if they start a website on a profitable niche and see that their efforts is bringing a good amount of money, they will get motivated no matter what the topic is. They will even do research and learn about it if needed.

So what is my position now? I think that both strategies can work. Choosing a niche or topic because you love it is a good route to success, but choosing a profitable one and approaching it scientifically can be equally successful.


Copyright by Daily Blog Tips.

Should You Really Write About What You Love If You Want to Make Money Online?

Tip’d: A Social Media Site on the Rise

Tip'dWith so many open source variations of social media sites, there are new ones launched every day.  Most cater to a very small niche and rarely make it to 100 registered users.

Tip’d is the exception.  After its official launch last week, it has already made some amazing strides as of October 20, 2008:

  • 750+ registered users
  • 1000+ articles submitted
  • Approaching 10,000 Tips received
  • 600+ comments made

The real splash, though, is in the quality of users.  Social media powerhouses like zaibatsu, tamar, jaybol, Emit, nowsourcing, weblaunches, webaddict, 1only, coloneltribune, ritubpant, TunisianGuy, and  adrian67 have been active on the site.  Many of them came because of the endorsement of another social media powerhouse, msaleem. (more…)

7 Tips for Coping with Email Overload

This is the feature article in this week’s RealtyBiz Agent Success Newsletter.

I’m now back from Spain and have spent the last week trying to catch up on email, contacts, client relationships, and everything else that I put on hold for my vacation. Getting away was great – and I made sure not to do any work on the trip – but coming home to an inbox filled with thousands of messages was not fun.

While I love the instant access to virtually anyone that email provides, that instant access can be a huge drain on my productivity – especially when 80% of the email I receive is not urgent, doesn’t require a response, or never seems to get to the point.

If you’re struggling to manage your email, here are seven tips to help.

  1. Only check email at certain times. While it’s tempting to leave your email program open at all times, that’s a huge productivity killer. You don’t need to check every email the second it comes in, thus interrupting whatever task you were doing. Instead, set aside 20-30 minute blocks of time two or three times per day to check email. If this type of non-responsiveness makes you nervous, create an autoresponder that states the specific times you check email, when the sender can expect a response, and what to do if they have an urgent need.
  2. Make sure those times aren’t when you are most productive! While it’s tempting to check your email first thing in the morning, this isn’t always the most productive. Instead, Brian Tracy suggests in his book, Eat That Frog, that you should look over your to-do list and find the biggest task that will yield the most positive benefits if you complete it now – and do that first thing in the morning rather than start off the day with email. Your email can wait. Use your most productive times to work on the stuff that matters most.
  3. Delete liberally. You can delete a considerable portion of your email before you even open it just by checking out the sender and subject. Scan both, and then ask yourself “Do I really have to read this today?” If the answer is no, hit delete. Don’t keep it around in hopes of reading it later – it will probably just sit in your inbox unopened.
  4. Scan for action steps and deadlines. Much of the email we receive can be classified as junk mail or notifications and doesn’t require action on our part. Look for email that does require a specific action that must be done within the next week or two and set these email aside. These should be your top priority.
  5. Take action immediately. If the email requires you to take action and you can do that action in less than two minutes, do it now rather than putting it off. It’s better to get things done quickly than to put them off until you prioritize everything. For action steps that will take longer, move the email to a prioritized folder so you can easily find it along with all the other action-oriented emails. Searching for buried email lost in a sea of unimportant email is a huge time waster.
  6. Send concise replies. When you respond, keep it as short and to-the-point as possible. Start off by summarizing the key point you are responding to and add your reply, so your recipients understand your response in context. For instance: “You asked if I can attend a meeting on Monday, June 16 at 3PM. Unfortunately, I’m not available until 4PM. If that doesn’t work for you, I can also meet Tuesday morning.” You don’t need to write a book here. Limit yourself to a few sentences at most – or better yet, if you can answer the question in the subject line, do so.
  7. Outsource your email. I don’t actually do this (yet) but if you really want to take this concept to an extreme, check out this blog post by Tim Ferriss, author of The 4-Hour Workweek, on How to Outsource the Inbox and Never Check Email Again.

Time is your greatest asset, and learning to manage your email effectively can really give your productivity a boost.

 Page 5 of 13  « First  ... « 3  4  5  6  7 » ...  Last » 

Switch to our mobile site